welcome to Bruce County

Emergency Management

Tips For Dealing With Winter Storms

Download this document, Tips For Dealing With Winter Storms, for some information about dealing with winter weather.

Community Emergency Management Coordinator (CEMC)

The Community Emergency Management Coordinator (CEMC) is responsible for the promotion, development, implementation and maintenance of the emergency preparedness plans for the County of Bruce. Emergency management consists of four areas - Mitigation/Prevention: Actions taken to reduce or eliminate the effects of an emergency or disaster. - Preparedness: Actions taken prior to an emergency or disaster to ensure an effective response. - Response: Actions taken to respond to an emergency or disaster. - Recovery: Actions taken to recover from an emergency or disaster.

Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act

The Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act is the legislative authority for emergency management in Ontario. The Act is supplemented by an Order in Council that sets out which provinical ministers are desigated special emergency responsiblities in emergency management. For communites and the provincial gevernment, the Emergency Management and Civil Protection Act provides for the establishment of an emergency management program in Ontario, based on hazards and risks that the people of Ontaro may face. Elected heads of council are responsible for ensuring emergency management programs exist within their jurisdictions.

Communities Respond First

When emergencies happen, they are routinely dealt with at the community level by local emergency response organizations, including police, fire, emergency medical services and public works. Most emergencies do not require provincial assistance. If a major emergency occurs in a community, the local head of council should implement their emergency response plan or declare an emergency if required. The head of council, supported by local officials who come together as the Community Control Group, then work to ensure a controlled, centralized and coordinated emergency response.

Individuals are responsible for their own safety, and the well-being of their families. Everyone should be prepared to take care of themselves and their families for up to three days in the event of an emergency or disaster.

Teaching your children how to use 911

Teaching your children how to use 911 is crucial and could save their lives or yours. Here are four simple steps for teaching your children, no matter how old they are, how to use 911:

  1. First explain what 911 is.
  2. Teach them to assess the risks before dialing 911.
  3. Explain what type of information to give once they have called 911.
  4. Practice scenarios with them to make them more familiar with the concept without frightening them.

For more 911 information for children, please see thissafety tip. You can share it with your family and friends

Are You Prepared?

A flood, extended power outage, hazardous material leak or other disaster could affect water supply, cut electricity and phone service for days or even weeks. Emergency responders will be on the scene, but they can't reach everyone right away.

Being prepared means being ready to cope for at least the first 72 hours of an emergency while those in urgent need are helped first. It can also make real situations less stressful for you and your family.

There are lots of quick, inexpensive things you can do to prepare your family (some of them take less than five minutes)!

  1. Know the risks – learn about local risks and plan for those that are more likely to occur. Is there spring flooding? Forest fires? Earthquakes? To find out more click here.
  2. Make a family emergency plan – since your family may not be together when an emergency happens, a plan will help you and your family know what to do and how to reach each other in an emergency.Click here to check out our NEW "Making a Family Emergency Plan" video.
  3. Talk to your kids about emergencies.Teach them basic personal information so they can identify themselves if they become separated from you, and who to call like 9-1-1 or your local emergency number, to get help.
  4. Get an emergency kit – find out exactly what goes in a kit by watching our short video, "Preparing a Family Emergency Kit in Plain English," then share the link with friends or family.
  5. Take part in a local event – this year marks the 15th anniversary of EP Week, during which provinces and territories across the country join the Government of Canada and other partners in raising awareness about the importance of being prepared.
  6. Download and read a publication or visit your local Service Canada Centre to pick up a copy of Your Emergency Preparedness Guide.
  7. Take part in a contest from a "72 Hours" campaign supporter, Energizer, for a chance to win an emergency kitwww.Energizer.ca/beprepared.
  8. Participate on Facebook – select anemergency preparedness button and change your Facebook profile picture; write on your wall about how you have prepared for an emergency; or create your own emergency preparedness fan page. The button and lots of great information for your fan page can be found atGetPrepared.ca

So, do your part! Take time to get the whole family involved and have fun getting prepared!

P.S. Stay in the loop year-round and become part of the growing number of Canadians who want to share experiences and learn more about how to prepare for emergencies byfollowing us on Twitter @Get_Prepared.